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Three articles in this webpage:
1-PP. All producers and plant capacities
2-BOPP, BOPET & BOPA. All producers and plant capacities
3-Where competition can lead or, the tale of PP in a continent

Polypropylene
All producers and plant capacities

ISBN:9789078546320


CONTENTS
I-INTRODUCTION
The introduction includes topics such as PP structure,
synthesis, production processes, applications and properties.
Page 1
II-PRODUCERS & CAPACITIESPage 12
A-PRODUCTION IN N.AMERICA(3 tables)Page 12
B-PRODUCTION IN LATIN AMERICA(2 tables)Page 14
C-PRODUCTION IN EUROPE(4 tables)Page 15
D-PRODUCTION IN ASIAPage 19
1-Arabic Peninsula(2 tables)Page 19
2-China(10 tables)Page 21
3-India(1 table)Page 28
4-Indonesia(1 table)Page 28
5-Iran(1 table)Page 29
6-Japan(2 tables)Page 30
7-Korea(2 tables)Page 31
8-Malaysia(1 table)Page 32
9-Philippines(1 table)Page 32
10-Russia(1 table)Page 33
11-Singapore(1 table)Page 33
12-Taiwan(1 table)Page 34
13-Thailand(1 table)Page 34
14-Vietnam(1 table)Page 34
15-Other(1 table)Page 35
E-PRODUCTION IN AFRICA(1 table)Page 36
F-PRODUCTION IN OCEANIA(1 table)Page 36


The data shown below are not necessarily recent.
They just give an idea on the layout of the data base.



The PP producers in Asia are tabulated by country.
An example is given below


PS:
C = Copolymer
E = Homopolymer
I = Impact
( ) Future production plans

To order a complete list of all producers (around 170 sites) worldwide [Euros 40, paid by bank transfer (SEPA countries only) or with credit card via PayPal (email to use: dk@gem-chem.net), for all other countries], tabulated as shown above, visit:
THE POLYMER BOOKSHOP
or send us an email (dk@gem-chem.net)or call (++32-2-7710649) or click on the button below.
The data base can be sent recorded on cd-r upon request
GEM-Chem's publications are strictly for personal use
ALL PUBLICATIONS ARE REVIEWED AND UPDATED CONTINUOUSLY.
THEY ARE RE-EDITED, BEFORE SHIPMENT.
GEM-Chem's PUBLICATIONS ARE ALWAYS NEW.
GEM-Chem's TITLES ARE NEVER OBSOLETE.


For information & comments contact Dr Demosthenes Kyriacos, President & CEO,
GEM-Chem, E-mail: dk@GEM-Chem.net, phone: +32-2-7710649

D.Kyriacos has worked at Upjohn, GE and ICI in international TS, Sales and Marketing.
He holds a B.Sc.(Distinction, Honours, Univ. award of Chemistry) from Alexandria, a M.Sc.course,(ICI scholarship award) in Polymer Technology and, a Ph.D. from Loughborough (UK).
D. Kyriacos is the founder of DK Business Group and GEM-Chem.
Deny Kyriacos: LinkedIn profile



BOPP, BOPET & BOPA
All producers and plant capacities

ISBN 9789078546412

CONTENTS
A-INTRODUCTIONPage 1
1-Methods of film productionPage 1
2-Post extrusion operationsPage 9
3-PP, PET and PA comparisonPage 10
4-ApplicationsPage 11
B-PRODUCERS & CAPACITIESPage 11
1-North America(3 tables)Page 15
2-Latin AmericaPage 17
a-Argentina (1 table)Page 17
b-Brazil(1 table)Page 17
c-Mexico(1 table)Page 18
b-Other(1 table)Page 18
3-Europe(6 tables)Page 19
4-AsiaPage 22
a-Arabic Peninsula(1 table)Page 22
b-China(21 tables)Page 23
c-India(2 tables)Page 34
d-Indonesia(2 tables)Page 35
e-Iran(1 table)Page 36
f-Israel(1 table)Page 36
g-Japan(2 tables)Page 37
h-Korea(1 table)Page 39
i-Malaysia(1 table)Page 39
j-Pakistan(1 table)Page 40
k-Philippines(1 table)Page 40
l-Russia(1 table)Page 40
m-Taiwan(1 table)Page 41
n-Thailand(1 table)Page 41
o-Turkey(1 table)Page 41
p-Vietnam(1 table)Page 42
5-Africa(1 table)Page 42
6-Australia(1 table)Page 42
C-MARKET DATAPage 43 to 47

The data shown below are not necessarily recent.
They just give a rough idea on the layout of the data base.

N. America
Company
Location BOPP
Ktpa
BOPET
Ktpa
BOPA
Ktpa
References
www.
Remarks
Honeywell USA, NJ
Pottsville
40 honeywell.com Capacity
Unconfirmed

Latin. America
Company
Location BOPP
Ktpa
BOPET
Ktpa
BOPA
Ktpa
References
www.
Remarks
Treofan Mexico
Zacapu
55 -treofan.com
-Personal com.
Jul 2010
Production includes
one 36.5 Ktpa
Brückner line

Europe
Company
Location BOPP
Ktpa
BOPET
Ktpa
BOPA
Ktpa
References
www.
Remarks
Mitsubishi
Polyester film
Germany
Wiesbaden
50 -m-petfilm.com
-Personal com.
Jul. 2010

Asia
Company
Location BOPP
Ktpa
BOPET
Ktpa
BOPA
Ktpa
References
www.
Remarks
Appexl China
Fujian
Xiamen
70
(2 lines)
20
(2 lines)
-appexl.com
-Personal comm.
Aug. 2010

To order a complete list of all producers (around 250 sites) worldwide [Euros 40, paid by bank transfer (SEPA countries only) or with credit card via PayPal (email to use: dk@gem-chem.net), for all countries], tabulated as shown above, visit:
THE POLYMER BOOKSHOP
or send us an email (dk@gem-chem.net) or call (++32-2-7710649) or click on the button below.
The data base can be sent recorded on cd-r upon request
GEM-Chem's publications are strictly for personal use
ALL PUBLICATIONS ARE REVIEWED AND UPDATED CONTINUOUSLY.
THEY ARE RE-EDITED, BEFORE SHIPMENT.
GEM-Chem's PUBLICATIONS ARE ALWAYS NEW.
GEM-Chem's TITLES ARE NEVER OBSOLETE.


For information & comments contact Dr Demosthenes Kyriacos, President & CEO,
GEM-Chem, E-mail: dk@GEM-Chem.net, phone: +32-2-7710649

D.Kyriacos has worked at Upjohn, GE and ICI in international TS, Sales and Marketing.
He holds a B.Sc.(Distinction, Honours, Univ. award of Chemistry) from Alexandria, a M.Sc.course,(ICI scholarship award) in Polymer Technology and, a Ph.D. from Loughborough (UK).
D. Kyriacos is the founder of DK Business Group and GEM-Chem.
Deny Kyriacos: LinkedIn profile



Where competition can lead or
the tale of PP in a continent

This article, like all non fiction stories is addressed to those who do not know.
The comments of all readers who know but still have the interest as well as the patience to go through the text are very welcome.
This article outlines the history of Australia's polypropylene industry.
The ascent of Australia as an industrially developed country was prompted by the imposition of substantial taxes (tariffs and duties) and restrictions (licenses and quotas) on imports that competed with locally made goods. The government policy attracted several companies to manufacture locally, products which were usually imported.
It would be unfair to omit, in that respect, the willingness and drive of Australia's people (5.5 millions in 1925 versus 21.5 millions in 2008) in developing their own country despite the discovery of substantial oil and gas reserves in Australian soil. The adventure of Australia's polypropylene industry went through several phases.

1-Establishment of refineries and petrochemical complexes
An important aspect to the development of the polypropylene industry in Australia was the establishment of refineries.
The first refinery of relevance to this topic is the Clyde refinery (20 km west of Sydney) which is opened in 1927.
The feedstock obtained from several sources as well from the Bass strait is shipped to Gore bay in Sydney and transported by barge along the Duck river to the refinery.
In 1928 Shell, which operates in Oceania since 1901, buys the Clyde refinery. Nowadays, crude oil, feedstock and products are transferred from the Gore bay terminal to the refinery by a 19km pipeline.
In 1951, Shell builds a second oil refinery, close to the Bass strait, at Geelong, 70 km south west of Melbourne in Victoria. The operation of the refinery relies on both local and imported feedstocks.
Another development is the commissioning of the Altona petrochemical complex in August 1961. It is located about 4km, south west of Melbourne, Victoria, near a petroleum refinery operated by the petrochemical complex venture partners Mobil and Exxon (at the time Standard Oil's Stanvac).
Between 1936 and 1940, ICI begins its investment in Australia by acquiring or establishing key chemical manufacturing plants in Victoria, New South Wales and South Australia.
ICI's major petrochemical manufacturing facility is located at Botany, close to Sydney.
In 1979 ICI builds a high cost LPG/naphtha cracker at Botany. Given that LPG/naphtha crackers are only competitive against ethane-based units by utilisation of the co-produced feedstocks C3 and C4, only the presence of a polypropylene plant justifies the operation using naphtha. The cracker uses naphtha purchased from the Caltex refinery at Kurnell (across ICI's plant) and LPG shipped from Bass Strait. In 1983, ICI invests also in an ethane cracker.
                                         
Altona is very well located with natural gas supplied by pipeline from Bass Strait and naphtha brought in from Bass Strait after processing at the nearby Mobil Altona Refinery. Altona therefore has a substantial feedstock cost advantage over the Botany complex.
In 1996, the LPG/naphtha cracker is converted to use ethane transported with a 1400 km long pipeline from the Cooper Basin in South Australia & Queensland.

2-Establishment of Polypropylene plants
In 1970-71 Shell commissions the first PP plant in Australia. The 25Ktpa plant is built at Shell's Clyde refinery.
Two years later Hoechst, which by entering in 1964 the market could relatively be considered as a newcomer in Australia, establishes, a 24Ktpa PP plant at Altona. The feedstock is supplied by the Exxon/Mobil refinery (now operating a Fluidised Catalytic Cracker), next door. The PP plant is expanded to 60Ktpa in 1979.
In 1979, Shell begins operations in a second polypropylene plant built, this time, in Geelong. The plant capacity is 60 Ktpa. It receives its C3 feedstock from Shell's cat cracker in its Geelong refinery.
By 1979, the production of C3 from the Botany LPG/naphtha cracker reaches a level which justifies an investment in a competitively sized polypropylene plant. Therefore, ICI commissions a 50Ktpa polypropylene plant at Botany. The plant has been expanded to a final capacity of 85Ktpa. However, the conversion, in 1996, of the Botany cracker to an ethane one and the planned expansion of Shell's PP plant in Clyde, announce the end of ICI's PP operations in Australia.

3-Competition
The Australian petrochemicals industry being in the hands of multinationals, cannot remain unaffected by the events occurring in the international arena.
In 1994 Shell and Montedison reach an agreement to merge their PP (and PE) operations into a 50-50 joint venture. The new company is Montell.
In 1995 Montell acquires Shell's polypropylene business in Australia (two polypropylene plants at Geelong and Clyde) and in 1996, Shell purchases the Montedison portion in Montell to own 100% of the joint venture.
In 1997 BASF and Hoechst enter a 50:50 polyolefins joint venture. The new company is named Targor. During the same year, Hoechst Australia, sells its PP operation at Altona to its neighbour Kemcor Australia. Kemcor,formerly Altona petrochemical, is a 50-50 joint venture between Exxon Corporation and Mobil (In November 1999, Exxon purchases Mobil for US$61 billion).
Still, in 1997, Montell's Clyde polypropylene plant is expanded to 130 000 tonnes.
In July of the same year, ICI Australia becomes an independent Australasian company after its parent company, ICI Plc, divests its 62.4% shareholding in the company.
As a result of the sell off ICI Australia is required to change its name and on February 1998 it becomes known as Orica.
Earlier on, in October 1997, ICI Australia announces the sale of its polypropylene business to Montell Australia.
The company, by now Orica, closes its Botany polypropylene plant in mid-to-late 1998.
By the end of 1999 Shell and BASF announce the merger of their polyolefins businesses. The new venture would combine Elenac (equally owned by BASF, Deutsche Shell & Shell Chemie), Montell and Targor into one of the world's largest polyolefins enterprises. Shell and BASF would each own 50% of the new enterprise which would have its holding company in The Netherlands. The new company is named Basell. Eventually its Australian subsidiary is named Basell Australia. The company has in its ownership both Shell's PP plants in Clyde and Geelong.
During the tumultuous days of 1999, a new company is established through the merger of Orica (Polyethylene) and Kemcor Australia (Exxon/Mobil) which owns the 45Ktpa Hoechst PP plant at the Altona Petrochemical Complex. The name of this new company is Qenos.
In March 2005, Basell Australia buys Qenos' polypropylene business.
The acquisition will lead to only one Australian polypropylene producer and the Qenos relatively small PP plant in Altona, is soon put out of action.

4-Is the conclusion a form of monopoly
In July 2004 Shell and BASF are reviewing strategic alternatives regarding a divestiture of their joint venture Basell. The aim is the reduction of their exposure to low-margin commodity plastics
In August 2005, Basell is sold to Luxembourg based Nell Acquisition, an affiliate of New York-based Access Industries, owned by billionaire industrialist Len Blavatnik.
In November 2005, China National Chemical Corp. (ChemChina of Beijing) acquires Qenos and, the tale goes on.
In December 2007, Basell Holdings acquires Houston's Lyondell Chemical Co. The public argument being that the merger is not driven by cost saving synergies but has a complementary nature leading to higher profitability. A new company called LyondellBasell emerges. Consequently, Basell Australia becomes LyondellBasell-Australia. It remains the only PP manufacturer in Oceania. Its plants in Clyde and Geelong have capacities of 170 and 130Ktpa respectively.
Two years later, in December 2008, LyondellBasell is close to bankruptcy and files for protection against creditors according to the well known and so dreaded Chapter 11.
The company claims that its subsidiary in Australia is safe. Its only competitors are PP imports.
It will probably be bought out or sold to another company to save LyondellBasell's owners from total collapse unless their management shows the signs of brilliance which, until now, they lacked (Article composed in June 2009).

For information & comments contact Dr Demosthenes Kyriacos, President & CEO,
GEM-Chem, E-mail: dk@GEM-Chem.net, phone: +32-2-7710649

D.Kyriacos has worked at Upjohn, GE and ICI in international TS, Sales and Marketing.
He holds a B.Sc.(Distinction, Honours, Univ. award of Chemistry) from Alexandria, a M.Sc.course,(ICI scholarship award) in Polymer Technology and, a Ph.D. from Loughborough (UK).
D. Kyriacos is the founder of DK Business Group and GEM-Chem.
Deny Kyriacos: LinkedIn profile

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on Polymer Science, Engineering, Technology and Marketing.
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